Handwriting the Constitution

What does the U.S. Constitution actually say? On January 20, 2017, artist Morgan O’Hara took a pen and paper to the central branch of the New York Public Library and began to write her own copy of the document in long hand. In what she describes as “a form of protest for introverts”. She was soon joined by others. Since then, there have been some 119 sessions on three different continents and more than 2,000 participants.

Morgan says: “This art practice was created so that people will know their rights, deepen their understanding of laws created to protect these rights, and helps resist negative thinking.”

This summer, the Old Stone House is hosting the first online version of the Handwriting Project, collaborating with several Historic House Trust sites in New York City, as well as a community of artists in Europe. Please join Latimer House on Thursday, September, 17 as we co-host the final session of this unique series.

Commit to spending time with the U. S. Constitution, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or choose another document. Participation is casual and members will have the opportunity to share their documents. Please have paper, pens, and whatever materials you might want to work with available.

Thursday
09/17/20
12:00pm-2:00pm

Register